notbecauseofvictories:

also that whole tale of aragorn and arwen thing where he saw her in the woods at twenty and fell instantly in love and it’s very beren and luthien? lies.

aragorn decided he was going to marry arwen when he was like, six.

and everyone thought it was just the

lilith-not-eve:

Marrying young is not the end of my freedom. It means I want to travel and see the world, but with her by my side. It means I still like drinking in bars and dancing in clubs, but stumbling home with her at 2am and eating pizza in our underwear. It means I know that I want to kiss those lips every morning, and every night before bed. If you see marriage as the end of your ‘freedom’, you’re doing it wrong.

raspomme:

Here’s a list of fonts I use for typesetting manga, making signs/banners, etc.

This is not necessarily a list of “good” fonts; some of these fonts are heavily flawed design-wise but are effective in very small quantities, such as sound effects, or used with certain words.

I was too lazy to categorize them by type but if that’s something people want, then I’ll do it.

archaicwonder:

Extremely rare gold Unicorn of James III, struck in Edinburgh, Scotland c. 1484-88
The gold Unicorn was introduced during the latter part of his reign, although the king’s titles and name are absent from the coins of this issue, their place held by a repeated Latin legend, EXURGAT DEUS ET DISSIPENTUR INIMICI EIUS, translating to mean “Let God arise and let his enemies be scattered” (Psalm 68:1). Both the legend and the absence of the royal name may be explained, in part, because of the political rivalries of the day, for James as a young king (age 9 when coronated) exhibited immaturities which caused his alienation from the nobility who surrounded him. He was born during May of 1452. His mother, Mary of Gueldes, commanded his kingdom until she died in 1463. He was never popular among his subjects, and most of his nobles despised him as weak and disaffected. He was much alone. At age 18, he married Margaret of Denmark, through whose dowry Denmark ceded the Orkney and Shetland islands to Scotland.
Despite this marriage, he was effete and preferred his boyfriend, John Ramsey, to his wife, which enraged his nobles. He treated his brothers poorly and was incessantly threatened by Edward IV of England, who had allied himself with one of James’s brothers and invaded his land twice.  At age 36, he was either murdered or died at the end of a battle of rebellion led by his nobles, who had championed and then selected as monarch his eldest son, Prince James.
Impure as these players upon the royal stage may have been, James’s  Unicorn was nearly pure gold (22.5 ct) and in the next two reigns the coin became the principal gold issue, trusted and valued as being of high gold content. This piece was struck at Edinburgh, depicts the mythical beast supporting the royal shield showing a lion rampant on it, and a large annulet appears before the unicorn’s rear hooves. James Stewart may have been less than regal in real life but his golden Unicorn has continued to be one of the most prized of all Scottish coins.
More about Unicorn coins…

archaicwonder:

Extremely rare gold Unicorn of James III, struck in Edinburgh, Scotland c. 1484-88

The gold Unicorn was introduced during the latter part of his reign, although the king’s titles and name are absent from the coins of this issue, their place held by a repeated Latin legend, EXURGAT DEUS ET DISSIPENTUR INIMICI EIUS, translating to mean “Let God arise and let his enemies be scattered” (Psalm 68:1). Both the legend and the absence of the royal name may be explained, in part, because of the political rivalries of the day, for James as a young king (age 9 when coronated) exhibited immaturities which caused his alienation from the nobility who surrounded him. He was born during May of 1452. His mother, Mary of Gueldes, commanded his kingdom until she died in 1463. He was never popular among his subjects, and most of his nobles despised him as weak and disaffected. He was much alone. At age 18, he married Margaret of Denmark, through whose dowry Denmark ceded the Orkney and Shetland islands to Scotland.

Despite this marriage, he was effete and preferred his boyfriend, John Ramsey, to his wife, which enraged his nobles. He treated his brothers poorly and was incessantly threatened by Edward IV of England, who had allied himself with one of James’s brothers and invaded his land twice.  At age 36, he was either murdered or died at the end of a battle of rebellion led by his nobles, who had championed and then selected as monarch his eldest son, Prince James.

Impure as these players upon the royal stage may have been, James’s  Unicorn was nearly pure gold (22.5 ct) and in the next two reigns the coin became the principal gold issue, trusted and valued as being of high gold content. This piece was struck at Edinburgh, depicts the mythical beast supporting the royal shield showing a lion rampant on it, and a large annulet appears before the unicorn’s rear hooves. James Stewart may have been less than regal in real life but his golden Unicorn has continued to be one of the most prized of all Scottish coins.

More about Unicorn coins…

pxlbun:

roses

marthajefferson:

statuemania:

Dornröschen (Sleeping Beauty), by Louis Sussmann-Hellborn, 1878 - Berlin, Germany.

marthajefferson:

statuemania:

Dornröschen (Sleeping Beauty), by Louis Sussmann-Hellborn, 1878 - Berlin, Germany.

riva-mika:

just because i ship it doesnt mean i expect it to become canon

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Chatsworth House, England.

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Chatsworth House, England.